PowerPoint Secrets – Where’s the Center?


Here’s a a 144 pt Calibri character:


An outline has been added (blue). The alignment is Center; the text box attributes are:


Since you have read my post on the size of Calibri, you will not expect the character itself to be 144 pts high. The actual character height (green box) is about 1.26 in. The text box (blue) is 2.42 in high; I don’t know why (maybe it has something to do with line spacing). I have added a red bar 144 pts (2 in) high. None of the other dimensions seems to have any obvious relationship to 144 pts.

The situation is similar with Arial:


The “graphical center” of the character is as indicated by the “handles;” rotating the object manually bears this out.

Or is  it?

Here’s the object with a Spin animation:

I added the blue lines to the object to indicate its “graphical center” and the red lines to show the position in the background.

Note that the Spin animation rotates the object around a different “animation center.” Some other animations are also affected; here’s a Grow/Shrink animation:

The gray image indicates where the animation should end up, based on the graphical center. The animation thinks the center is somewhere else,

Text typed into a shape has (apparently) different dimensions; here’s a 2 in circle with a 144 pt character (Do not autofit is selected):

c25The alignment tools treat this shape as expected, given the bounding box and handles.

However, animation treats this kind of shape differently. Here’s what a Spin animation looks like.

The shape wobbles because it is Spinning around a point different than the graphical center. Here’s how a few other objects containing the text Spin:

There is another area where the presence of text has an unexpected effect: conversion to pictures (pngs). Here are examples:

c24The first object is a rectangle with some lines added; the png version appears identical. The second object is the same but with text typed into it.  The png version is substantially bigger and the center is offset. I don’t know why.

The moral to this overall story is that when you’re working with text, there can be some unexpected results. There may be other anomalies than those mentioned here.

Following are some workarounds for these examples:

  • You can deal with the picture conversion issue by cropping the result to any size and shape you need.
  • You can also cure the wobble by converting the object to a picture and then cropping to get the center of the picture congruent with the geometric center. The disadvantage is, of course, that the picture can’t be edited like the original object.
  • You can group the object with a containing circle to force the center of rotation to any desired position.  Here’s an example; the circle is green but would normally be made invisible (No line). The circle must be made fairly large to eliminate the wobble:
  • When a character is typed into a shape, these anomalies occur when the text is large relative to the shape (even though it appears to be contained within the shape). You can fix them by reducing the text size but I assume there’s a reason you wanted the text large in the first place. By the way, I had to reduce the text size to 60 pts in a 2 in circle to get the wobble to go away – a reduction to about 40%.

Well, dear reader, I tire of these irritants and end this treatise. Resume your duties.

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