Posts Tagged 'breakthrough'

PowerPoint Secrets – Using Transitions as Animations

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In my last post, I used a slide transition to simplify construction of a “photo carousel” effect. This post is about using transitions in other unusual ways.

But first, I beg your indulgence for a short rant about transitions. To wit: transitions are like animation in general; using transitions just because Microsoft says they are “exciting” is poisonous. They should be used only for a reason (see this post for a more complete essay on this subject). See this article for a similar view. Finally, see this source to see how bad this kind of thing can get.

The carousel post used a “dynamic content” transition; this essentially allows you to specify which objects on the slide are affected by the transition effect. Other objects (e.g., the slide title, background and your logo) remain fixed during the transition. So, the effect looks like an animation rather than a transition.

In the usual transitions, the entire slide is affected. Of course, in some cases, this not apparent. Here’s an example using a transition to a second slide to mimic an Entrance animation:

This is a Random Bars transition but, since the two slides are identical except for the “review” box, only the review box “appears.” Unfortunately, this doesn’t add much to our toolbox, since only 8 of the 45 available transitions (in my version of PowerPoint) work this way. And these don’t add much to our animation repertoire.

In some cases, a transition that affects the entire slide can be used effectively. Here’s an example:

This is a version of an effect I developed in my earlier breakthrough post. This one uses a Fracture transition and is much simpler to create.

Only a few dynamic content transitions (7 in my version) are available. Is there a way to use the other transitions as animations? The answer is, as you might expect, sort of.

The trick is to build the transition effect in a separate file, convert it to video, and then insert into your presentation where needed.

Whoa, you might say. Isn’t this overkill? Is it worth it to get involved in the complications of video?

Don’t be intimidated, dear reader. PowerPoint video conversions are easy and work quite well. How do you think I made all the demos you see in these posts? In fact I think I’ll look at some more video-related projects in upcoming posts.

Here is a project that uses a video for the “curtain” effect:

Here’s how:

  • The basic slide is created first, with the text.
  • In a separate presentation, create two slides. The first is the customer service agent, and the second is a rectangle with the text “PLEASE WAIT.” The rectangle is sized and positioned so that, after the transition to the second slide, the rectangle will cover the agent. The slides look like this:

cs1

  • On slide one, set the transition to None, and check the Advance Slide/After 00:00:00 box. This will make the transition to the nest slide occur automatically, immediately after the presentation starts. On slide 2, set the transition to Drape and set the Duration (2.75 sec in my case). Also, check the Advance Slide/On Click box; this prevents the presentation from ending with a black screen.
  • Run Slide Show to check the results. Edit the slides as needed.
  • Now convert to video: select File/Export/Create a Video.
  • Select Internet Quality; this is usually sufficient for presentations.
  • The Use Recorded Timings and Narrations box should appear; this means that the conversion will  use the transition timings you have set. If this box doesn’t appear automatically, go back and make sure that the slide transitions are timed rather than “on click.”
  • Click Create Video. I usually use the filename of the PowerPoint file (the default) for the video. Conversion may take a while; there is an indicator that the conversion is happening at the bottom of the PowerPoint window.
  • Here’s what the video looks like:
  • Next, insert the video in the original slide. Select Insert/Video/Video on My PC… and select the video created above. I used the same slide size for the video as the original so the inserted video placeholder will cover the whole slide.
  • In Video Tools/Playback, set Start to Automatically. This will put the video in the Animation Pane like an animation effect.
  • Click on the video placeholder and use Video Tools/Format/Crop and resize to get the video placeholder to the right shape, size and location. This is just like working with a Picture.
  • Open the Animation Pane. You will see the video as an event and as a “trigger” item. The trigger is not needed in this application; Remove it from the animation pane.
  • Animate the text and set the timing relative to the video as needed. Note that the duration of the video does not appear, unfortunately.  Here’s the slide and animation pane:

cs2

  • Run Slideshow to verify the effect: the second line of text and the “curtain” should appear on click.

Here are some additional notes on this technique:

  • In the example, the backgrounds of the presentation and the video are the same (white); that is, the background of the PowerPoint file used to create the video is the same as the background where the video will be used. You can get away with this for a uniformly colored background but a more complicated (e.g., gradient) background may cause problems.
  • Some transitions involve extra “background” elements. For example, Gallery moves the slide images against a black background that you may not want and there is no way to make this disappear.
  • Using a bigger crop of the video may increase (or not) the impact of the effect. You can set the aspect ratio (slide size) of the PowerPoint file used to create the video so that you can use the entire slide if you desire.

Wow. This is getting more complicated than I intended. So, I’ll show some more examples in a follow-up post. You can try experimenting with the technique in the meantime.

As usual, if you want a free copy of the PowerPoint files used in this post, use the link below and click on the PowerPoint icon to download a “source” PowerPoint file:

Powerpointy blog – transitions as animations

Here is the source file for the video:

Powerpointy blog – sm cutain video source file

See this page for more on downloading files.

If you have questions, praise or complaints, please add a comment below. If you appreciate my efforts, liking or following this blog might be a good idea.

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Animating a “Breakthrough” in PowerPoint – Part 2

This is the second in a series on using a “breakthrough” animation to dramatically introduce a brand, product or other “punch line.” This example is simpler than the version in the previous post:

 

NOTE: This post has been revised – the original version asked you to use Freeform drawing to create the breakthrough fragments. If you aren’t comfortable with this method, I’ll show you how to use standard shapes and the Merge Shapes operations to draw the fragments.

In this animation, two fragments break away from each other revealing the message. Here’s how to create the fragment shapes:

  • For the top fragment, draw a Rectangle (shown in blue) covering the top part of the slide and extending an inch or so to the left:

bk2u1.png

  • Now make a shape to Subtract from this rectangle to form the top fragment. Add a Right Triangle (dark gray) to approximate the angle needed to create the bottom edge of the shape:

bk2u2.png

  • Add a series of Triangles (light gray) covering the upper edge of the right triangle. Use various shapes, rotations and sizes – these will create the ragged lower edge of the upper fragment:

bk2au.png

  • Select all the triangles (including the large one) and use Merge Shape/Union to combine into a single shape and Subtract it from the blue Rectangle. This completes the upper fragment:

bk2u3.png

  • Duplicate the slide and add a Rectangle (shown in green) covering the lower edge of the upper fragment. Extend this rectangle to the right to match the horizontal dimension of the upper fragment:

bk2u4.png

  • Subtract the upper fragment from the green rectangle to form the lower fragment:

bk2u5.png

Now, use the fragment shapes to divide the background photo:

  • Position the photo on a slide. Duplicate the slide and copy the upper fragment to the slide. It will retain its position. Intersect the upper fragment with the photo:

bk2u6.png

  • Repeat the process to form the lower fragment of the photo.
  • Copy the two photo fragments to a slide (outlined in red for clarity):

bk2u7.png

The animation is accomplished by Spin effects applied to the two fragments. To establish the pivot point/center for the spins, add a circle to each fragment, centered at the desired pivot point and larger than the fragment. Here is the upper fragment and its “centering circle:”

bk2u8.png

Group the fragment and the circle so that the group spins as a unit. The pivot point is the same for the lower fragment – add the appropriate circle to the lower fragment. I used Drawing Guides to center the two circles.

To complete the animation, apply Zoom to the text and Spins to the fragments as shown here (I also added a shadow to the upper fragment):

bk2u9.png

If you want to see more details, use the link below and click on the PowerPoint icon to download a free “source” PowerPoint file containing this project:

Powerpointy blog – Animating a breakthrough part 2 u

See this page for more on downloading files.

If you have questions, praise or complaints, please add a comment below. If you appreciate my efforts, liking or following this blog might be a good idea.

 


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